Push-behind string trimmers? UPDATE

texsuze
Herd Member
Posts: 359
Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2015 4:50 pm
Location: Texas, The Lone Star State!

Push-behind string trimmers? UPDATE

Postby texsuze » Wed Jun 14, 2017 3:49 am

Last week, at my local Tractor Supply, they had a Cub Cadet string trimmer parked out front, so I was intrigued. Like a gasoline push lawnmower, but only two wheels (in back) and the string trimmer (parallel to the ground) at the front end. I have several areas around the barn and along fence lines where something like this might be useful, especially with the stemmy-type grasses, and uneven ground. I don't want to wield a weed whacker on a pole--too cumbersome. And I can't get DH to weed whack when needed :(

Anyone have any opinions on these types of trimmers, or on the Cub Cadet brand?


7/2/17: We bought the DR Trimmer and DH is testing right now ;) I'm staying inside, hoping he'll have fun with MY new toy and will undertake lots of cutting around the yard! Initial report: easy to use, easy to get in amongst the bushes and grass we don't want to cut --we bought the cutter guard attachment thingy---, much easier on the back (no more swinging that pole weed whacker), starts with no problem, not any louder than a lawn mower, very easy to install the cutting string--we also bought the upgrade attachment for that. I still need to master using this beast in my barnyard, but that will be for another time!
Last edited by texsuze on Sun Jul 02, 2017 6:37 pm, edited 1 time in total.

kande50
Bringing Life to the DDBB
Posts: 1463
Joined: Sun Oct 11, 2015 7:28 pm
Location: Williamstown, MA

Re: Push-behind string trimmers?

Postby kande50 » Wed Jun 14, 2017 10:08 am

Let me know if you get one and it works out. The reason I think I might want one is because then I'd be further away from the trimmer so might not get so covered with crud, which is only a problem because I like to weed eat for about an hour at a time and every time I do it I get covered from head to toe with green gunk.

Srhorselady
Herd Member
Posts: 242
Joined: Sun Oct 11, 2015 9:55 pm
Location: Arizona

Re: Push-behind string trimmers?

Postby Srhorselady » Wed Jun 14, 2017 6:16 pm

I'd like to know about these also. I saw the TS ad for them and wondered how they would work for larger areas where holding the weed wacker gets heavy. Let us all know if you get one.

texsuze
Herd Member
Posts: 359
Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2015 4:50 pm
Location: Texas, The Lone Star State!

Re: Push-behind string trimmers?

Postby texsuze » Thu Jun 15, 2017 5:01 pm

I'm researching them, and then perhaps some 4th of July sales will help me pull the trigger! Speaking of pull, that's one thing I'm concerned about, since our former push lawnmower was almost impossible to get started, what with yanking the pull cord, which was as long as I am tall :( So I'll have to get my hands on the string trimmer to see how easy it is to start.

One guy I spoke with said these string trimmers don't do a great job with just standard lawnmowing (i.e. golf course, carpet grass yards, etc), but are best for hard-to-reach locations with thicker grass; that's the application I'm looking for.

Literiding
Herd Member
Posts: 129
Joined: Sun Oct 11, 2015 7:53 pm

Re: Push-behind string trimmers?

Postby Literiding » Thu Jun 15, 2017 8:58 pm

I bought my first DR trimmer back in 1993 or ’94. The engine gave up in 2014 although the frame is still in great shape and one of these days, I’ll see if I can find a replacement engine. I had bought a bigger and more powerful replacement in 2012 so I continue to trim on.

The large mower trimmers are best suited for areas that are only mowed a couple times a season or where the grass and brush have been allowed to become too heavy for the two cycle hand held trimmers. The heavy cords on the DR trimmer will take out saplings up to 3/8 of an inch in diameter and most everything else smaller than that. With the “Beaver” blade (a circular chain saw on a disk) young trees, kudzu, and bamboo can be cut back as well. Unfortunately the Beaver blade leaves a one to one and half inch little stump which is rather dangerous to fetlocks so sapling clearance in the pasture isn’t recommended. If you trim weekly or bi-weekly, the hand held trimmers are much faster to use than a wheeled trimmer. For example, to trim a fence post with a wheeled trimmer, you have to trim the left side, pull the trimmer back, trim the side facing you, pull back, reposition, and then push forward to trim the right side. With a hand held trimmer, you could trim the whole post in a third of the time. But when the grass and growth is eight inches deep, the wheeled trimmer will trim through just like a bush mower. Because the strings are quite durable, hitting rocks and the ground doesn’t even slow it down. Hitting rocks and the ground will accelerate wear and very rarely break a string but generally isn’t something to worry about. But it will throw sticks, rocks and dirt a considerable distance to the right and animals and children should be kept clear.

With the wheels holding the machine up, the string trimmer can be accurately held to cut a single seed stalk against a fence post without hitting the post. If you have any Crepe-Myrtles or other decorative plants with thin bark, you can trim around them quite closely. The DR trimmer is excellent for mowing along a foundation or wall (remember to keep the wall on your left to throw the clippings forward). It can be used as a mower for small plots, such as areas the large deck mower can’t get into. Since the string tears the vegetation, it’s not a “smooth” grooming cut but I’m quite happy if all the growing things are about the same height when I’m done. With my eight horse power DR trimmer, I’ve cut heavy grass that was thigh high along a fence line without difficulty so the tractor didn’t need to get up close and personal to the fence.

In terms of effort, it is about the same level of effort as using a push mower so I find a tank of gas is about all the trimming I’ll do in a day. Depending on what you are cutting, using the heavy duty strings, I usually change the strings after one or two tanks of gas. They wear quite quickly when trimming along a brick or cinder block wall, less quickly along a sheet metal shed or fence posts and last the best when just cutting grass without any woody plants. But remember, a sheet metal edge will cut the string which will require a return to shop for a new string. The DR mower and most of the other brands I’ve looked at use two different strings attached 180 degrees apart on a spinning head. With strong hands, strings can be changed in about three to five minutes each — somewhat longer if they’ve been on the mower for a while. They form a “set” that make the old strings hard to get off. I rarely need them, but I make sure I know where my needle nosed pliers are when changing string.

DR makes electric start and self propelled trimmers. I have an electric start which I haven’t used in several years because the eight HP Briggs and Stratton engine has “compression relief” and I have little difficulty starting it. I don’t have any experience with the self propelled machines.

For your online window shopping enjoyment:

http://www.drpower.com/power-equipment/trimmer-mowers/

If you click on a mower, at the bottom of the page there are user comments similar to Amazon. If you “Sort By: Lowest Rating,” you can learn the bad along with the good.

kande50
Bringing Life to the DDBB
Posts: 1463
Joined: Sun Oct 11, 2015 7:28 pm
Location: Williamstown, MA

Re: Push-behind string trimmers?

Postby kande50 » Fri Jun 16, 2017 12:22 pm

texsuze wrote:I'm researching them, and then perhaps some 4th of July sales will help me pull the trigger! Speaking of pull, that's one thing I'm concerned about, since our former push lawnmower was almost impossible to get started, what with yanking the pull cord, which was as long as I am tall :( So I'll have to get my hands on the string trimmer to see how easy it is to start.


That's always been my issue with equipment, too. But my dh is good with equipment and he figures out how to start everything and then I just have to write it down so I don't forget.

I had to pull the cord on one of our weed eaters 15 times to start it, but once I knew that it would start if I just kept pulling I was fine with that. It was easy enough to pull, but just took a lot of repetitions.

redsoxluvr
Herd Member
Posts: 302
Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2015 12:02 am

Re: Push-behind string trimmers?

Postby redsoxluvr » Sat Jun 17, 2017 4:33 am

We have a Husqvarna high wheel trimmer. This thing has saved our bacon more times than I can count. It's been invaluable to us.
We've used the DR trimmers and I prefer the Husqvarna. The DR rattles your brains out and is very hard to control.
The Husqvarna did equally well or better and cost us less than $300.

FWIW the Husqvarna and DR were equally easy to start.

texsuze
Herd Member
Posts: 359
Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2015 4:50 pm
Location: Texas, The Lone Star State!

Re: Push-behind string trimmers?

Postby texsuze » Mon Jun 19, 2017 7:22 pm

OK, I've just ordered the DR trimmer with 'easy peasy string attachment', manual start. DH decided to chime in and give his opinion, so here we go. Once I've had the chance to test it out (this will be MY machine....) I will try to remember to post an up date here. There is a 30-day trial available in case it doesn't meet expectations, plus, S/H is free right now. Thanks for all the input.

piedmontfields
Bringing Life to the DDBB
Posts: 1570
Joined: Mon Oct 19, 2015 4:41 pm
Location: E Tennessee USA

Re: Push-behind string trimmers? UPDATE

Postby piedmontfields » Fri May 18, 2018 11:01 pm

Interesting! I've always considering trimming one of my "core workouts" (basic Stihl straight trimmer). I think our property is too wild for the wheeled option, but I'd like to hear about experiences.

texsuze
Herd Member
Posts: 359
Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2015 4:50 pm
Location: Texas, The Lone Star State!

Re: Push-behind string trimmers? UPDATE

Postby texsuze » Wed May 23, 2018 4:26 pm

Time flies. Nearly a year later and we still have the DR trimmer, which DH has used. He likes the strength of the strings, the ease of string replacement, and the optional little edge guard thingy, which helps keep distance from fence posts, etc. However, he reverted back to the Stihl weed wacker last week when attacking some unwanted vegetation growing amongst some desired vegetation. Just a matter of ease of access for touchy areas. He hasn't pulled out the DR yet this year but I'm sure it will get some exercise, since there's lots of growing/cutting in the coming months. BTW, we're out in the country--complete opposite of golf course-type landscape.

Fzybtfrm
Greenie
Posts: 18
Joined: Wed Dec 09, 2015 2:20 pm

Re: Push-behind string trimmers? UPDATE

Postby Fzybtfrm » Sun Jun 24, 2018 1:31 pm

Here's my two cents worth. We just bought one of these for mowing an uneven part of our property that is too rocky to brush hog. Actually, my husband used the brush hog on it at a height of about 6 inches, then I used the string trimmer on it. Its a monster, got a nice cut low to the ground, could avoid bigger rocks or move them as I went and maneuvers nicely around fence lines , telephone poles, etc. It was a bit of a rough go as the ground is very uneven in this area, would have been a breeze over smoother ground. It doesn't cover a lot of ground ( I think ours has a 22" cutting radius), but did a super job. My hands went numb from gripping the push bar, but thats just because I'm old, nothing about the machine! Very easy to operate and changing the strings is super easy. It can fling rocks, ours has a nice rubber flap behind to keep them from being flung at YOU. A big positive is that the strings striking rocks is unlikely to cause a spark, whereas using a mower with a metal blade hitting a rock could cause a fire. And living in the high desert of Nevada, that is always a caution. It is great for areas we can't do with the brush hog, smaller areas with lots of "stuff" you have to maneuver around, like between trees and the fenceline. We are very happy with its performance, and if I can operate one, anyone can!


Return to “Facilities & Transportation”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest